Cardboard Radio

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Instead of using the traditional route to find skilled applicants, George Patterson Y&R in Melbourne created a working cardboard radio kit for Melbourne Defence Force Recruiting and sent it to engineering and electronics students as the first part of their application.

It came with everything they needed to build it and tune into a dedicated radio station to hear the job ad, except there were no instructions. They wanted to test engineering students’ problem solving and wiring skills.

If they were able to build the radio and find the station created specifically for this campaign, they hear the ad played on a continuous loop.

The radio is still functioning long after they found their star applicant and lead to the most successful recruitment drive the Defence Force has had.

See how it works here.

 
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SNIPPETS

 
Valentine's Day card with handwriting on the front

Handwriting is back in vogue

The trend towards turning off from digital devices is continuing with a New York Post report showing 87% of Millennials saying they value a handwritten note over other communication methods. Time to think about new ways of marketing?
Read more…

 
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Kids stuff for designers

Here's a risky way to advertise: send out an ad that illustrates just how much you need a professional. The City of Los Angeles recruited a graphic designer by advertising the vacancy using an image that looked like it was drawn by a child.
Read more...

Norway is the top spot to write a book

 
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According to the Spanish literary magazine, Babelia – El Pais, Norway comes out on top of the best places in the world to be a writer or a publisher.

To inject new life into and protect their culture from the influence of the English-speaking world, the Norwegian government actively promotes book reading by buying 1,000 copies of every Norwegian book published, and 1,500 copies for children’s books.

"It was a very serious situation for a country as small as ours with a territorially so limited language," explains Oliver Møystad, head of fiction at NORLA (Norwegian Literature Abroad) headquarters in Oslo. "There was a fear that it could disappear if something was not done to promote literature, which has always been considered a source of renewal and transmission of the language."  

The scheme has kept many small publishers alive and provides a rare source of income for the country’s writers. 

Bookshops won’t discount a new book in its first year and there is no tax on books. Norway’s support of its writers and other artists has helped to secure their place in world literature, quite the challenge for a country of only 5 million people.

Story sourced from Babelia - El Pais.

A phone booth in Norway converted to a public library. Photo Jo Straubewww.jostraube.no..jpg

Make their Valentine's Day special this year

To help you out - because we love to help - here's a map of greetings card shops in the Perth CBD and some suggestions from Hallmark about what to write in a Valentine'sDay card.

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A handwritten card is not only traditional for Valentine's Day, it also says you care enough to take the time to get it and to say something meaningful.

“When we write, a unique neural circuit is automatically activated,” said Stanislas Dehaene, a psychologist at the Collège de France in Paris. “There is a core recognition of the gesture in the written word." 

When we write by hand, we're communicating from the heart. Those few words express far more than flowers.

It’s more fun,” said Margaret Shepherd,
a professional calligrapher
and author of The Art of the Handwritten Note.

It is such a delight to see that ink go on
that beautiful paper — to slow down and realise
you spoke to someone in the best way possible.

If you've received a handwritten note any time in the last ten years, you'll know what she means.

Simple, heartfelt words show your love on Valentine's Day. They don't wilt and they raise your gift above the click-swipe immediacy of an electronic message.

Make their Valentine's Day special this year.

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